Worst Internet Rumors to Avoid When it Comes to Safe Sex Practices

Worst Internet Rumors to Avoid When it Comes to Safe Sex Practices

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Most everyone knows that the best source of information when it comes to sexual health is their doctor. Most doctors are highly trained and educated in this field, yet many people are reluctant to ask their doctors about sex advise.

Whether it be embarrassment, inconvenience or for privacy reasons, most people resort to the internet to seek out whatever answers they are looking for. The internet is a great tool when it comes to seeking out information but the problem with the internet is that there is just as much bad information out there as there is accurate information.

Many of these websites which give sexual advice are outdated and not maintained so the user is provided with information that is no longer accurate. In some cases they may come across information that is just wrong altogether, so it is easy to get confused and mislead.

Here Are the Biggest Myths Still Perpetuated Today When It Comes to Sexual Health

1 – You Can Get STDs From a Toilet Seat

The idea that this ridiculous concept is still around is a testament to how horrible some of the advice found on the internet can be.

The first thing you need to know when it comes to the bathroom and STDs is that urine is sterile and clean when it first comes out of your body. It sounds gross, but urine is so clean when it comes out you could get away with drinking it which is common in a survival situation.

In addition to your urine being sterile, toilet seats themselves aren’t great environments for bacterial to live on anyway. Toilet seats are hard and non-porous which makes them easy to clean without leaving many germs left behind.

You shouldn’t be worried about getting STDs from surfaces, be more concerned about STDs that come as a result of skin to skin or fluid to fluid contact. You can’t get an STD from a toilet seat but you can get one from rubbing up against the wrong person so keep that in mind.

2 – A Woman Can’t Get Pregnant on Her Period

It is understandable how this myth came about because there is some truth to it. The fact is that women are less likely to get pregnant when they’re on their period, but the chance of it happening isn’t completely eliminated.

preview-full-shutterstock_627313202The reason why a woman can still get pregnant on her period is because of how the cycle works, and how long sperm can stay alive within the woman’s reproductive tract. If you’re having sex towards the end of her period it is still possible that some sperm stay alive long enough to get her pregnant.

Women who have shorter cycles, ones shorter than your typical once a month period are the ones more at risk for becoming pregnant during this time. This is because these women typically ovulate earlier in their cycles as opposed to those with longer cycles, making it more likely that they get pregnant on their period.

3 – Emergency Contraceptives Do Not Cause Abortions

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One of the biggest misconceptions about the “morning after pill” is that it causes an abortion. If you are already pregnant and decide to take plan B, it is already too late.

The difference between the morning after pill and one that induces pregnancy is that the morning after pill is designed to work before the pregnancy starts, where the fertilized egg attaches to the uterus.

The morning after pill is really only useful within the first 24 hours or so after sex, hence the name. If its been longer than that and you think you may be pregnant and don’t want the child, the morning after pill won’t work, and you will have to seek out another option.

4 – Birth Control Pills Make You Gain Weight

This is another myth made extremely popular by the internet, as it has no basis in science. Birth control pills are one of the most widely tested medications on the market, and still to this day there are no studies out there that link birth control pills to gaining weight.

The problem with this myth is that many people who are on birth control do experience weight gain, but it is believed to be caused by other influences.